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REDD+

Supporting nationally led REDD+ initiatives in 64 developing countries

The United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries was launched in 2008 and builds on the convening role and technical expertise of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The UN-REDD Programme supports nationally led REDD+ processes and promotes the informed and meaningful involvement of all stakeholders, including indigenous peoples and other forest-dependent communities, in national and international REDD+ implementation.

About

About REDD+

Deforestation and forest degradation account for approximately 17 per cent of carbon emissions, more than the entire global transportation sector and second only to the energy sector. It is now clear that in order to constrain the impacts of climate change within limits that society will reasonably be able to tolerate, global average temperatures must be stabilized within two degrees Celsius. This will be practically impossible to achieve without reducing emissions from the forest sector, in addition to other mitigation actions. Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) is a mechanism developed by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). It creates a financial value for the carbon stored in forests by offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. Developing countries would receive results-based payments for results-based actions. REDD+ goes beyond simply deforestation and forest degradation, and includes the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks.

How

How We Work

The Programme

The United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries was launched in 2008 and builds on the convening capacity and technical expertise of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). ​The overall development goal of the Programme is to reduce forest emissions and enhance carbon stocks in forests while contributing to national sustainable development. The UN-REDD Programme supports nationally led REDD+ processes and promotes the informed and meaningful involvement of all stakeholders, including indigenous peoples and other forest-dependent communities, in the implementation of REDD+ activities agreed under the UNFCCC. The Programme has expanded steadily since its establishment and over 60 countries spanning Africa, Asia-Pacific and Latin America are now partners.

We supports partner countries through: -Direct support to the design and implementation of National REDD+ Programmes; -Complementary tailored support to national REDD+ actions; and -Technical capacity building support through sharing of expertise, common approaches, analyses, methodologies, tools, data, best practices and facilitated South-South knowledge sharing.

Benefit

How does REDD+ benefit developing countries?

Developing countries that meet UNFCCC REDD+ requirements (see box “Elements of UNFCCC Warsaw Framework for REDD+”) will receive results-based payments for verified emissions reductions. As such, REDD+ creates an incentive for these countries to reduce emissions from forests, and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. By implementing REDD+ actions, countries will contribute to conserving their national biodiversity and to the global fight against climate change. In addition to the environmental benefits, REDD+ also offers social and economic benefits. Most recently, it is being integrated into green economy strategies. REDD+ is also a tool to realize achievement of the transformative 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by world leaders in September 2015. The new agenda calls on countries to begin efforts to achieve 17 Sustainable Development Goals over the next 15 years. While REDD+ is directly linked to Climate Action (goal 13), it can also play an important role towards Responsible Consumption and Production (goal 12), Gender Equality (goal 5), Life on Land (goal 15), and Decent Work and Economic Growth (goal 8) among others.

Importance

Why is REDD+ important?

Deforestation and forest degradation have long been recognized as significant sources of carbon emissions, as trees store carbon and when they are destroyed this carbon is released into the atmosphere contributing to greenhouse gases that cause climate change. As up to 11 per cent of carbon emissions are caused by deforestation and forest degradation, it is important that the reduction of these emissions is part of the global plan to fight climate change. REDD+ is the identified mechanism to do so. In addition to their carbon storage role, forests are valuable in many other ways. This includes water regulation, soil protection, non-timber forest products including food and fibre, climate regulation and biodiversity. In fact, it is estimated that 1.6 billion people depend on forests. As such, by conserving forests, REDD+ offers a broad range of social, environmental and economic benefits to developing countries and forest communities.

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